Storage Tips


A Guide to Self-Storage: Packing Tips

Self-Storage


[ https://www.houzz.com/magazine/a-guide-to-self-storage-packing-tips-stsetivw-vs~103281167 ] The first two parts of this guide to self-storage looked at the options, sizes and costs and the questions to ask before renting. Of course, the “self” in “self-storage” means that, unless you arrange and pay to have someone pack up your things and move them into the unit, you are responsible for this job. This last part offers some guidelines to packing a unit efficiently. How to Pack a Self-Storage Unit Make sure clothing and other fabric items are clean. Put heavy items in small boxes and light items in large boxes. Put clothing in wardrobe boxes. Put the heaviest stuff on the bottom of the unit and distribute weight evenly. Put anything you need to access often at the front of your unit. Leave a pathway to the back of the unit. Elevate things off the floor. Store mattresses, protected with a cover, upright along the side of the unit for short periods only; for long-term storage, keep them flat with nothing on top. Wrap mirrors and pictures with bubble wrap and store them upright along the side of the unit. Disassemble weak or heavy pieces of furniture. Cover furniture with sheets, not plastic, which could trap moisture. Store sofas (except sofa beds) on an end to maximize space. Clean refrigerators and freezers, drain water supply lines, vacuum coils, fill with other kitchen items and store with doors slightly ajar. Avoid moving during a rainstorm to prevent mold and mildew. Don’t store anything that is toxic, hazardous or perishable. Prepare an inventory, including an estimated replacement value for each item. Take pictures or a video for documentation. Consider securing the unit with a disc lock, regarded as one of the most drill- and pick-proof types on the market, but check any lock’s compatibility with your unit before purchasing. ...


Victoria Villeneuve
February 11th, 2018


A Guide to Self-Storage: What to Ask Before You Rent

Self-Storage


[ https://www.houzz.com/magazine/a-guide-to-self-storage-what-to-ask-before-you-rent-stsetivw-vs~103277150 ] About 1 in 10 U.S. households put their excess stuff in a mini storage unit. Some of them will lose part or all of it because of theft, default, negligence or a catastrophic event. To lower the chances of this happening to you, know what to ask before you rent and whether you’re covered by insurance. If possible, visit the prospective facility, including at night. If that’s impractical, try to get as much information as you can about the following topics. Building and location How is the building constructed? Is it in good condition? Is it in a safe, well-lit area or one that’s high in crime? What about its potential for flooding? Is it near any businesses that could attract vermin? Does it offer exterior and interior units? Is it single- or multistory? Cleanliness Is the place tidy? How often does it get cleaned? Does it have a pest-extermination contract in place? What are you required to do to keep your unit clean? If a facility isn’t regularly and thoroughly cleaned, there’s a chance that bug and rodent infestations won’t be discovered. Access Are you the only one who can enter your unit, or can the landlord get in to, say, make a repair? Is your access restricted or 24/7? If it’s by appointment, how much notice is required? Under what circumstances could the landlord lock you out, and how do you regain access? How do you reach your unit? Do you need drive-up access, or can you get by with a trolley and an elevator? How wide are the driveways? Do you need a wheelchair-accessible unit? Restrictions Is there a value limit on what you can store in the unit? What can’t you store in it? Typically, restrictions prohibit anything perishable, hazardous, noxious, flammable, explosive or illegal, along with plants, animals and people. “Some allow band practice,” says Alexander Harris, web editor for SpareFoot.com, a marketplace for finding and reserving storage. “But generally the facilities aren’t zoned for habitation.” Payment and delinquency or default What ...


Victoria Villeneuve
February 10th, 2018